Sea Glass Shawl

 

When is a sock not a sock...When its a shawl!

One of our lovely customers recently requested some Opal 6ply sock yarn in colours that we didn't stock.  Luckily I was able to get them in for her and very glad that I did because when they arrived I was a bit enamoured with them myself!  

I kept looking at the gorgeous colours imagining what yummy things could be made with them!  Although the yarn wasn't as soft and squishy as I normally like to use (Opal sock yarn has a squishy factor of 6 - Kittens) I did think it would soften after a wool wash.

 

 

I started looking around at different shawl patterns but I just wasn't finding anything that jumped out and said 'pick me, pick me'.  The sort of pattern I was looking for was fairly plain and simple as I wanted to show off the beautiful colours in the yarn.

I decided that I would create something, and as often happens when the creative bug hits me, allowing the pattern to evolve as I went!

 

 

I was working on my shawl at our property near the beach on the Bellarine Peninsula in Victoria. I was sitting there, crocheting and enjoying the sun coming through the windows and looking out over the water.  I was thinking about how gorgeous the yarn was and that it was working up beautifully, there were no hard transitions in the colours and they sort of blend together effortlessly.  

It might have been the location I was in at the time, but my shawl started to remind  me of tumbled, smoothed, sea glass and that's how my shawl got its name!  

When I was finishing the last rows a soft ripple started to emerge reminding me of the softly lapping waves on the shore at Portarlington.

 

 

So to the Sea Glass Shawl pattern......

I haven't tested this shawl pattern as its such a simple repeat.  If you have any trouble with it please don't hesitate to let me know!

If you do use my pattern please acknowledge me as the designer!

I used two balls of Opal Sock Yarn in colour way Der Schurke - The Villain to make my Sea Glass Shawl. Opal Sock Yarn is 25% polyamide, 75% wool so is machine washable (and it definitely softened up beautifully after a eucalyptus wool wash).

I used a 4mm hook for my shawl which was small enough to give me stitch definition but large enough to provide good drape.

 

Uk crochet terms used throughout.

ch - chain

tr - treble crochet

dc - double crochet

dtr - double treble crochet

sk - skip

st - stitch

 

Hint - remember to turn your work at the end of each row - this ensures that the shawl can be worn either way and creates a lovely textured pattern!

 

Row 1

Make a magic ring and ch3.  3tr into the ring, ch2, 4tr into the ring, turn. 

 

Row 2

  • Ch3 (counts as first treble at the start of each round)  
  • 2tr in the first stitch,
  • 1tr in each stitch until the 2ch space.  
  • 1tr, 2ch, 1tr in the 2ch space.  
  • 1tr in each stitch until the last stitch of the row.
  • 1dtr into the final stitch of the round.  
  • Turn.

 

Row 3 - 33

  • Ch 3,
  • 3tr in the first stitch,
  • 1tr in each stitch until the 2ch space. 
  • 1tr, 2ch, 1tr in the 2ch space.
  • Itr in each stitch,
  • 1dtr into the final stitch of the round.
  • Turn.

 

Row 34

  • Ch 3,
  • 2tr in the first stitch,
  • sk the next st,
  • 3tr in the next st,
  • sk2, 3tr in the next st - repeat until the ch2 space 
  • 2tr, 2ch, 2tr in the ch2 space,
  • Sk2, 3tr in the next st repeat until the end of the row finishing with 3tr in the final stitch
  • Turn

 

Row 35 - 36

  • Ch3,
  • 2tr in the first stitch,
  • sk2 st, 3tr in the next space between the treble clusters from the previous row,
  • continue doing 3 tr in each space between the clusters from the previous row repeat until the ch 2 space 
  • 2 tr, 2 ch, 2 tr in the ch2 space, 
  • 3tr in the space between the treble clusters from the previous row -  repeat until the end of the row
  • 3 tr in the final stitch
  • Turn

 

Row 37-39

  • Ch 3,
  • 3 tr in the first stitch,
  • 1 tr in each stitch until the 2 ch space. 
  • 1 tr, 2 ch, 1 tr in the 2 ch space.
  • I tr in each stitch,
  • 1 dtr into the final stitch of the round.
  • Turn.

 

Rows 40-42

  • Ch3,
  • 1 tr in the same st,
  • 1 tr in the next st, ch 1, sk 1 st, tr 1 - repeat to ch 2 space (centre peak)
  • tr 2, ch 2 tr 2 in the ch2 space,
  • Ch 1, sk 1, tr 1 - repeat until end of row
  • 2 tr,
  • 1 dtr in final stitch
  • Turn

 

Rows 43-45

  • Ch3,
  • 3tr in the first stitch,
  • 1tr in each stitch until the ch2 space. 
  • 1tr, 2ch, 1tr in the ch2 space.
  • Itr in each stitch,
  • 1dtr into the final stitch of the round.
  • Turn.

 

Row 46

  • Ch 3,
  • 2tr in the first stitch,
  • sk the next st,
  • 3tr in the next st,
  • sk1, 3tr in the next st - repeat until the ch2 space 
  • 2tr, 2ch, 2tr in the ch2 space,
  • Sk1, 3tr in the next st repeat until the end of the row finishing with 3tr in the final stitch
  • Turn
Row 47-48
  • Ch3,
  • 2tr in the first stitch,
  • sk 1st, 3tr in the next space between the treble clusters from the previous row,
  • continue doing 3tr in each space between the clusters from the previous row repeat until the ch2 space
  • 2tr, 2ch, 2tr in the ch2 space
  • 3tr in the space between the treble clusters from the previous row -  repeat until the end of the row
  • 3tr in the final stitch
  • Turn

 

Row 49

  • ch1,
  • 2dc in the first st
  • 1dc in every stitch until the centre peak
  • dc2, ch2, dc2 in the 2ch space
  • 1dc in every stitch until the end
  • 3dc in final stitch
  • finish off and weave in the ends!

  

 Finished Sea Glass Shawl!

 

I hope you enjoy making the shawl as much as I did!

I would love to hear how you went with the pattern so pop a comment below, or you can pop a picture up on instagram using #thecalmingyarn hashtag!

Cheers

Andrea xxx